[Track of the Week] Rudimental ft Emeli Sandé – Free

Usually, it starts with a melody that won’t migrate or a bassline I find myself rocking out to hours after the music is over.  But, my love affair with Rudimental is different: it started with a Youtube video and a carefully woven story that was equal parts beautiful and tragic.  Sure – I’d listened to the song before but it takes skill  and intention to create something with a message as powerful as this.

Over the course of this past year UK based Drum & Bass quartet Rudimental has found a permanent place in my heart and if there’s one thing you should know about me by now it’s that I’ve set the bar incredibly high for anyone that dabbles in EDM.  Rudimental has roots in Hackney, London and is comprised of DJ Locksmith with singer / songwriters songwriters and producers Kesi Dryden, Amir Amor and Piers Agget.  They’ve seen some hot rotation on esteemed radio shows like Annie Mac’s on BBC Radio 1 and have been remixed over, and over, and over by some of the most creative minds in the business.

Beyond the inspirational track ‘Not Giving In’, their entire debut album ‘Home’ is solid gold from start to finish.  Even though their roots are firmly planted in ‘Drum and Bass’, these 4 hitmakers pull inspiration across the musical board and are on a self proclaimed mission to fuse modern Soul Music into their EDM.  And let me tell you – it shows! They sample some Deep House with their liquid Drum and Bass hit ‘Waiting All Night’ with Ella Eyre and the sultry single ‘Baby’ featuring vocals from MNEK and Sinead Harnett.  On the other hand, the Summer anthem ‘Feel the Love’ with John Newman has all the makings of a classic liquid drum and bass track.

For the past week, I’ve been on a new Rudimental kick – this time, with their single Free featuring one of my new favorite female vocalists Emile Sandé.  Even though this track is incredibly fresh off the press it already has a smorgasbord of remixes and no – I’m not complaining!   Hip-Hop heavy hitter Nas jumps in the mix and belts out a verse on a fresh version, Deep House maven Maya Jane Coles gives it her signature spin and Jack Beats creates a club worthy anthem.  As this track gains remix steam, there’s no telling how big it’ll get but here’s a clue: huge.

For kicks, you can download the original and the Maya Jane Coles remix for free on iTunes – I’d call this an early birthday present for sure!.

If you’re as hooked as I am, keep in touch with Rudimental across the interwebs:

Soundcloud | Twitter | FacebookYoutube

Trance: The Natural Evolution of Classical Music

Music, like math, seems to run in the family; both of my Grandmothers sang and played the piano.  My dad is a master of the guitar and the cello, which he brings out of the old closets every now and again.  My mom grew up playing the piano and still loves playing the guitar and piano as  hobby.  Growing up, the musical staples in the household were CCR, Johnny Clegg, Eric Clapton, U2,  the Jackson’s in any combination, and the soundtrack to La Bamba.

I picked up the flute when I was in 3rd grade; don’t let anyone tell you differently than this: it’s a difficult instrument!  I went from having a basic flute, to a silver flute, to a flute with open holes called the ‘French Model’. The older I got, the more modified the instrument became but my love for sports and physical competition outweighed my desire to play. (Fun Fact: The bone flute is the oldest recognizable instrument, coming in at 40,000 years old.)  Ironically, after I left the basketball team as a Sophomore I dove right into my music history class and joined the choir.

The more I studied the different periods of classical music, the more I picked apart modern music and saw it in context with society. The music genre says something very specific about the culture and era of the people that both produce it as well as absorbing themselves in it. The first CD I ever bought was Offspring’s Americana, my first mix tape was Hip Hop and R&B with the likes of Next, TQ, Nas, TLC and 2Pac.

By the time I was old enough to both understand what those rap songs were talking about and be annoyed by emo screaming, I’d gravitated towards electronic music and have dabbled in pretty much in subgenre, but Trance was my first love.

There were little to no vocals, and if they did exist there were sweet and delicate; much more pleasing to the ears. In my opinion, modern day trance is the natural evolution of classical music as a genre.  Songs contain harmony, modulation, and thematic development; they more or less follow strophic form and much like with classical composers, modern producers have essentially attained demigod status.

Most of my favorite DJs have a weekly broadcast on Digitally Imported Radio, which covers all genres of Electronic Dance Music – more commonly referred to as EDM.  I could go on and on and on about all of the different trance DJs and what they each bring to the genre, but I’d rather have you listen for yourself.  If you wanted to ask what my favorite trance tracks were, look no further than the Trance Thursday playlist below.  And if you still want more, check the links at the bottom for a few of the DJs and broadcasts I can’t live without.

Tracklist

  1. Lange vs Gareth Emery – This is All Out (Heatbeat vs Lange Edit)
  2. Andain – Promises (Myon & Shange 54 Summer of Love Mix)
  3. Tiesto ft Jes – Everything (Cosmic Gate Remix)
  4. Ørjan Nilsen feat. Neev Kennedy – Anywhere But Here (Radion6 Remix)
  5. First State – Falling (First State’s Stuck Parachute Mix)
  6. Maz Zo & Arty vs Oceanlab – Satellite Dynamics (Mat Zo Remix)

Podcasts: